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HIST 2000: Lotions, Potions, Pills and Magic: American Medicine 1650-1850: Welcome

Midwifery and Witchcraft in 17th Century New England

Books:

Karlsen, Carol F. 1989. The devil in the shape of a woman: witchcraft in colonial New England. New York: Vintage Books.

Tannenbaum, Rebecca J. 2002. The healer's calling: women and medicine in early New England. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.

Woodward, Walter W. "The Magus as Mediator: Witchcraft, Alchemy, and Authority in the Connecticut Witch-Hunt of the 1660s." In Prospero's America: John Wintrop, Jr., Alchemy, and the Creation of New England Culture, 1606-1676, edited by Walter W. Woodward, 210-252. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

Articles:

Harley, David. 1990. "Historians as demonologists: The myth of the midwife-witch". Social History of Medicine. 3: 1-26.

Purkiss, Diane. 1995. "Women's Stories of Witchcraft in Early Modern England: The House, the Body, the Child". Gender & History. 7 (3): 408-432.

Primary Source (primary sources are contained in this volume):

Hall, David D. 1999. Witch-hunting in seventeenth-century New England: a documentary history, 1638-1693. Boston: Northeastern University Press.

Early Public Health (late 18th Century)

Books:

Breslaw, Elaine G. 2012. Lotions, potions, pills, and magic: health care in early America. New York: New York University Press.

Finger, Simon. 2012. The contagious city the politics of public health in early Philadelphia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Leavitt, Judith Walzer, and Ronald L. Numbers. 1997. Sickness and health in America: readings in the history of medicine and public health. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Rosenberg, Charles E. 1962. The cholera years: the United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher. 1990. A midwife's tale: the life of Martha Ballard, based on her diary, 1785-1812. New York: Knopf.

Articles:

Becker, Ann M. 2004. "Smallpox in Washington's Army: Strategic Implications of the Disease During the American Revolutionary War". Journal of Military History. 68 (2): 381-430.

Finger, Simon. 2010. "An Indissoluble Union: How the American War for Independence Transformed Philadelphia's Medical Community and Created a Public Health Establishment". Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies. 77 (1): 37-72.

Primary Sources:

College of Physicians of Philadelphia. 1798. Facts and observations relative to the nature and origin of the pestilential fever, which prevailed in this city, in 1793, 1797, and 1798. Philadelphia: Printed for Thomas Dobson. http://opac.newsbank.com/select/evans/34355.

Philadelphia. Committee to attend to and alleviate the sufferings of the afflicted with the malignant fever: Minutes of the proceedings of the Committee, appointed on the 14th September 1793 by the citizens of Philadelphia, the Northern Liberties, and the District of Southwark to attend to and alleviate the sufferings of the afflicted with the malignant fever, prevalent in the city and its vicinity : with an appendix. From The Internet Archive.

Medicine of the Enslaved

Books:

Breslaw, Elaine G. 2012. Lotions, potions, pills, and magic: health care in early America. New York: New York University Press.

Covey, Herbert C. 2007. African American slave medicine: herbal and non-herbal treatments. Lanham: Lexington Books.

Fett, Sharla M. 2002. Working cures: healing, health, and power on southern slave plantations. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Johnson, Walter. 1999. Soul by soul: life inside the antebellum slave market. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Schwartz, Marie Jenkins. 2006. Birthing a slave: motherhood and medicine in the antebellum South. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Washington, Harriet A. 2006. Medical apartheid: the dark history of medical experimentation on Black Americans from colonial times to the present. New York: Doubleday.

Weiner, Marli Frances, and Mazie Hough. 2012. Sex, sickness, and slavery illness in the antebellum South. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Epidemics in Early America

Books:

Breslaw, Elaine G. 2012. Lotions, potions, pills, and magic: health care in early America. New York: New York University Press.

Burrows, Edwin G., and Mike Wallace. 1999. Gotham: a history of New York City to 1898. New York: Oxford University Press.

Crosby, Molly Caldwell. 2006. The American plague: the untold story of yellow fever, the epidemic that shaped our history. New York: Berkley Books.

Rosenberg, Charles E. 1962. The cholera years: the United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Watts, S. J. 1997. Epidemics and history: disease, power, and imperialism. New Haven: Yale University Press.

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